FIRAExova
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  • Green oak in construction

  • 1st
  • Peter Ross, Christopher Mettem, Andrew Holloway

  • TRADA Technology Ltd
  • January 2007
  • 978-1-900510-455
  • Paperback
  • 184
  • £24.70 (zero VAT)
  • £38.00 (zero VAT)
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A highly illustrated guide to the use of green oak, written by an expert team .
The authors describe the whole process of green oak in construction: the design, framing and enclosing of structures. They demonstrate how to achieve excellence in practice through a series of eleven inspirational case studies, featuring contemporary and historic structures: Stirling Castle roof; New roof to South Transept of York Minster; Darwin College, Cambridge; National Maritime Museum (cladding); Globe Theatre; The Downland Gridshell; Bedales School Olivier Theatre; Abingdon School Boathouse; Mill O'Braco (house); Ealing Bridge; Polesden Lacey Bridge.

Comprehensive specifying information, design data and grading rules are also included for reference. Green Oak in Construction is supported by the Forestry Commission and Scottish Enterprise.

Sample pages

A highly illustrated guide to the use of green oak, written by an expert team . The authors describe the whole process of green oak in construction: the design, framing and enclosing of structures. They demonstrate how to achieve excellence in practice through a series of eleven inspirational case studies, featuring contemporary and historic structures: Stirling Castle roof; New roof to South Transept of York Minster; Darwin College, Cambridge; ...
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 Green oak past and present
2.1 The medieval period
2.2 The post-medieval period
2.3 The present day
Chapter 3 The supply of green oak
3.1 Timber supply
3.2 Environmental issues
3.3 Costs
Chapter 4 The properties of oak
4.1 The living oak tree
4.2 Timber properties
4.3 Moisture content and drying movement
4.4 Durability
4.5 Strength properties
4.6 Creep deflection
4.7 Working qualities
4.8 Chemical properties
4.9 Behaviour in fire
Chapter 5 Design of green oak structures
5.1 The design of the frame
5.2 Performance of the structure
5.3 Historical forms as models for today
5.4 Drying movements
Chapter 6 The green oak framing process
6.1 The traditional approach
6.2 Automation
6.3 Selecting the timber
6.4 Appearance considerations
Chapter 7 Enclosing green oak structures
7.1 Design criteria and construction forms
7.2 Construction detailing
7.3 Drying movements and maintenance
7.4 Example details
Chapter 8 Exterior uses of green oak
8.1 General approach to durability in design
8.2 Appearance grading
8.3 External cladding
8.4 Decking
Page
Chapter 9 Case Studies
Historic reconstructions: 9.1 The Globe Theatre
9.2 Stirling Castle Roof
Traditional models: 9.3 Mill O’Braco house
9.4 Abingdon School Boathouse
Modern frames: 9.5 New roof to the South Transept of York Minster
9.6 Bedales School, Olivier Theatre
9.7 Darwin College, Cambridge
Innovative frames:
9.8 Weald and Downland Museum Gridshell
Exterior uses
9.9 The National Maritime Museum, Falmouth
9.10 Ealing Bridge
9.11 Polesden Lacey Bridge
Appendix I Specifying oak for traditional framing
AI.1 Defects
AI.2 Specification
Appendix II Green oak strength grading rules
AII.1 Scope
AII.2 The grades
AII.3 Definitions
AII.4 Measurement of features
AII.5 Grade limits
AII.6 Reference documentation
Appendix III Engineering design data
AIII.1 Strength design to BS 5268-2: 2002
AIII.2 Strength design to Eurocode 5 Part 1.1 161
AIII.3 Deflection of beams
AIII.4 Self weight of frames
AIII.5 Strength of pegged joints in tension
Appendix IV The green oak strength grading rules: Quick reference sheet
References and further reading
Glossary of terms
Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 Green oak past and present 2.1 The medieval period 2.2 The post-medieval period 2.3 The present day Chapter 3 The supply of green oak 3.1 Timber supply 3.2 Environmental issues 3.3 Costs Chapter 4 The properties of oak 4.1 The living oak tree 4.2 Timber properties 4.3 Moisture content and drying movement 4.4 Durability 4.5 ...
...more